12 Replies Latest reply: Aug 22, 2018 5:59 PM by twobitrentals RSS

    Do you tell guests about where to go in the event of a tornado?

    twobitrentals CommunityAmbassador

      Snice my property has the potential for tornados, when I get a warning from my cell phone for the area for that type of weather I send my guests an e-mail letting them know where the nearest shelter is.

       

      Do others do that with their guests, or do you just put it in your guest book?

       

      Just had this situation over the weekend, but never heard back from the guest. I did contact a neighbor there and she said other than severe thunderstorms all was good.

       

      I Wonder if anyone looks at the guest book to find that information or if contacting them directly is the best way to alert them???

       

      Suggestions?

        • Re: Do you tell guests about where to go in the event of a tornado?
          ohst8er Premier Contributor

          I can honestly say I've never ever thought of that.  hmmm...... 

          • Re: Do you tell guests about where to go in the event of a tornado?
            green_mango Active Contributor

            I'm not in a tornado area, but if I were I would have the info in the guest notebook/info provided & unless it happened often, I might consider texting instead of email since it's pretty time sensitive. 

            • Re: Do you tell guests about where to go in the event of a tornado?
              calicalling Active Contributor

              We've had several red flag fire warnings, power outages, snow events, a propane leak (street wide) and worst of all -- an avalanche that caught 35 of my guests and shut down our mountain while they were all on it.

               

              My town has an app and a text-blast system that sends out time-sensitive alerts to me that I pass on when needed.

               

              I always get a cell phone number so that I can communicate with guests really quickly. That saved my bacon the day of the avalanche.

               

              I also have a pop up on my online guest guide (where they must get all their check in info and wifi passwords) that gives general warnings and ways guests should plan to be prepared for emergencies including blizzard conditions, snowy roads, etc, that are real threats but not immediate emergencies. I activate it seasonally, when needed. They literally can't get their check in info without seeing it. If they choose not to read it, that's on them.

              • Re: Do you tell guests about where to go in the event of a tornado?
                feibus Senior Contributor

                I'd put it in the welcome documentation you send them ahead of arrival.

                 

                Mine are in Florida and although we get hurricanes, it's not often enough and the situation is different every time around, so I would contact our guests directly for those.

                • Re: Do you tell guests about where to go in the event of a tornado?
                  linky17 Active Contributor

                  Like you, my home IS in a tornado zone.  Nearby to a river, things can quickly get tricky and scary.  As you + others have professed, I do maintain weather-related apps, and encourage Guests to upload same in-advance of arrival, regardless of the season/week-out forecast.  As well, I'll send a text, as warranted via warnings which are generally apparent -- and alarming? -- via the sirens that are audible to the home.  I live nearby.

                   

                  I do have a basement, so having to direct folks to a nearby shelter isn't something (else!) that I need to worry about.  In the basement -- and readily available -- are those collapsible/'sideline' kind of chairs + a battery operated radio (pre-tuned to the local 'weather authority'), and flashlights.  I switch-out the batteries 2x annually.

                   

                  Mostly?  At least in my region of the mid-West: even us local folk are often confused by the difference between a 'warning' and a 'watch,' not to mention 'severe' storms/winds?  As you likely know, a tornado is often preceded by an odd, deceiving calm.  Most of my Guests would likely take false comfort in this.

                   

                  Thanks for the post.