Skip navigation

Join the Vacation Rentals Conversation!

Get answers to all of your questions from fellow owners and travelers.

Join the CommunityX

CommunitySeek, Ask, and Share in the Vacation Rentals Community
13291 Views 46 Replies Latest reply: May 20, 2013 12:42 PM by bobbie32 RSS
Currently Being Moderated

Feb 16, 2012 9:04 PM

When NOT to rent?

I am curious what situations might cause other owners to reject a potential renter. I recently had a renter, who was ready to confim, return my contract with changes he had made in red. My husband thought I should negotiate with him, but I refused. My contract is NOT negotiable!!  What has caused you to turn down a potential renter?

  • carol Senior Contributor 2,152 posts since
    Dec 10, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 16, 2012 9:33 PM (in response to gmajay)
    Re: When NOT to rent?

    Let's see:

    - prom or graduation parties (funny how they all describe themselves as very mature and responsible!)

    - any group with more people than my max occupancy (I suggest they might want to rent two houses or

        refer them to another house in town with more beds)

    - people who want to rent less than my 1-week minimum during peak season ( I tell them to wait until later)

    - people who want to send me more money than my rent (big red flag)

    - people I've rented to before who mistreated the house

  • bend2011 Contributor 163 posts since
    Apr 28, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 16, 2012 11:09 PM (in response to gmajay)
    Re: When NOT to rent?

    Good topic!

     

    -Anyone who has mistreated the house, my self, my partner or my cleaner.  I have no tollerance for disrespect.

     

    -Anyone who comes off as rude or arrogant on the phone or is not really sure if they are going to make it and they want to know my cancelation policy two days before they arrive.

     

    -Anyone who ask for unreasonable discounts, especially if I am already running a special or have extended an offer to them and they want more or it's not good enough.

     

    -You bet if some one tried to change my contract, I would not rent to them.  What the heck?

     

    Otherwise, if folks are polite and understanding, I have no issues and I am pretty flexible about who I rent to.  I will bend the rules left and right if I feel like the potential renter is a good person.

     

    Lara

    www.alluringbend.com

    • anja Senior Contributor 1,556 posts since
      Aug 9, 2011
      Currently Being Moderated
      Feb 17, 2012 12:26 AM (in response to bend2011)
      Re: When NOT to rent?

      First, I will not re-rent to anyone who left my place excessively dirty! And, I have turned down a few couples who wanted to come back. Second, anyone who is not polite to me during the inquiry.  My most extreme example:   A guy with a question about "price per night" called...he offered no other info when I asked...he only wanted to know "Just what I asked - price per night"....but he warned me that he'd spoken to several other owners already  ...and before I could even utter a syllable to give him my help he cut in and barked:  "Don't tell me there are different prices for different times...just give me the price!"   I knew this guy was already "dead in the water" ...but I gave him my advertised price per night... to which he replied: "I think you want to do better than that!"...implying if I wanted his business.    To which I calmly and politely replied: "I've answered your question...but you are not courteous to me when you want my help.... so I do not want you in my home....and I'm ending this conversation, aloha and goodbye."   {He called me the "c_ _ t" word and hung up first.}  Whew...lucky me...saved from a low life. Third, anyone who wants me to waive any point in my rental terms & conditions like my maximum occupancy limit  -or-  my payment terms  -or-  my no pet policy.

      • lrbaldwin Active Contributor 755 posts since
        Feb 16, 2011
        Currently Being Moderated
        Feb 17, 2012 9:18 AM (in response to anja)
        Re: When NOT to rent?

        Everything said above plus:

         

        I do family units only, but if they're vacationing with any other group that is renting another house (weddings, reunions, family friends etc), I turn them down.  Our kitchen is super equipped with high end equipment, perfect for preparing meals for BIG crowds, and we have a huge dining room table.  We learned the hard way a couple years ago....everybody from the other houses went to our cottage for meals. 

         

        Last year I got a call from a new owner about 2 blocks away from our cottage.  She was having a family reunion.  She wanted to house the 6 elders (over 60) in our house.  Sounds fine, right?  However, to avoid making the elders go up and down the steps too much, she planned to cook and serve every meal to the whole crowd at our house. I very politely turned her down, told her that our cottage just wasn't equipped to handle a crowd for meals. Have you ever attended a family reunion?  Ever notice any kids who were out of control?  No?  Then you haven't attended a reunion that included kids.

         

        Oh, and there was the inquiry a week ago.  In the Comments section, she said "Give me your best price."  I probably should have just ignored her, but I was fed up with scattergun inquiries.  Our posted rent was $2095.  I responded via email and told her that we do not negotioate on price because we are fully booked each year at full price. Then I told her my best price was $2195.  I wouldn't have rented to her even if she'd responded that she wanted the cottage at that price.  I'm not worried about filling that week.  It's the only week not yet booked for the summer.

         

        I think my main criteria are:

        1.  I want guests who have total control over themselves and their children.  There's no guarantee, but if there's a chance there will be uncontrolled children (as in the parents went to the beach or dinner and left their kids with friends or an aunt or cousin or some such), I'm not going to take the chance.

         

        2.  People who want an ultra cheap vacation.  Our house sleeps 8.  I will not rent to 4 couples without children, and I screen carefully on the phone if, say, there are 2 couples with 2 children each.  I've turned down that configuration when the children were teenagers.  The house just isn't big enough for them all to be comfortable, and that's just what I tell them.  I do give them the names of some other houses in the same price range that are bigger.

         

        Linda

        http://vrbo.com/315522

  • stjvilla Active Contributor 626 posts since
    May 27, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 17, 2012 9:48 AM (in response to gmajay)
    Re: When NOT to rent?

    Oh wow.  Those are some crazy stories.  Gmajay - totally agree with you not renting or negotiating.  Your contract is yours and if it doesn't work for them, they don't belong in your home.

     

    We don't usually have these problems, but won't rent if the house layout won't work for their group.  For example, 2 parents and 3 or 4 kids - our house can sleep 7 but the 2 master bedrooms are in different buildings with one in the main house and one in a separate pod.  Where are you going to put the kids?  In the separate bedroom pod, unsupervised, or the main house bedroom, unsupervised?  Neither works.  We actually built the house to be perfect for 1 couple, 2 couples, or 2 couples and a couple of younger kids.

     

    Larry and Margot

    • sophie Senior Contributor 969 posts since
      Mar 4, 2011
      Currently Being Moderated
      Feb 17, 2012 10:21 AM (in response to stjvilla)
      Re: When NOT to rent?

      I concur that if any one tries to change the contract, it's over.  Rudeness.  If someone says to me "Well house x will give it to me for $5 per night, but we really like YOUR property, can you match it??" as anja said, "He's dead in the water" I inform them that they better hurry and book that property because it won't last much longer!

  • iopbeachhouse Community All-Star 455 posts since
    Aug 10, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 17, 2012 12:39 PM (in response to gmajay)
    Re: When NOT to rent?

    It's hard for me to believe, but I have turned down two renters this year who wanted to rent only one bedroom and promised to confine themselves to only the kitchen, living room and master bedroom. This is a 4000 square foot home with 6 bedrooms and 5 1/5 bathrooms! Whether they use one bedroom or all six, the cost is the same! I was surprised to get this request once, but then I got another one a few weeks ago. What are they thinking? Four people don't need a 6 bedroom house and I'm not going to discount it to make it affordable for them.

    • lrbaldwin Active Contributor 755 posts since
      Feb 16, 2011
      Currently Being Moderated
      Feb 17, 2012 1:03 PM (in response to iopbeachhouse)
      Re: When NOT to rent?

      iopbeachhouse,

       

      That hilarious!  It reminds me of something that happened to us 30 years ago that we still laugh about.  We're way out in the country and had an old truck out front with a for sale sign on it.  The price was reasonable, but the guy looking at it wanted to know if we'd drop the price because all he was going to use it for was to take garbage to the dump.  We told him we didn't care if he drove it off a cliff.

       

      Linda

      http://www.chatterboxtoo.com

    • stjvilla Active Contributor 626 posts since
      May 27, 2011
      Currently Being Moderated
      Feb 17, 2012 4:44 PM (in response to iopbeachhouse)
      Re: When NOT to rent?

      And what are the chances they won't still use all the bedrooms and all the towels, etc.?  When we rent to just one couple in our 2 bedroom place, we can offer them a slightly lower rate and lock the separate bedroom pod.

  • jan.stevens Community All-Star 251 posts since
    Aug 30, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 17, 2012 8:00 PM (in response to gmajay)
    Re: When NOT to rent?

    Great topic!!

     

    This year I had a guy that was offended with the length of my rental agreement. He spent more time writing about how "too long" the agreement was.  I suspected he didn't want to sign the Pet Policy terms.  He had a 1 year old Huskie.  I sent him his money back and suggested that he stay at another Vacation Rental that didn't have a rental agreement.

    • lrbaldwin Active Contributor 755 posts since
      Feb 16, 2011
      Currently Being Moderated
      Feb 18, 2012 1:40 AM (in response to gmajay)
      Re: When NOT to rent?

      gmajay,

       

      Yes, you're exactly right about the renter attitude.  What a great description!  This is just our second year renting without an agency.  Last year we were fully booked by Mar 1, and this year we're booked up as of today.  Now we are confident enough to allow ourselves to have an owner attitude.

       

      Linda

    • anja Senior Contributor 1,556 posts since
      Aug 9, 2011
      Currently Being Moderated
      Feb 18, 2012 4:40 AM (in response to gmajay)
      Re: When NOT to rent?

      I think I understand your distinction. First, I do not think of - or refer to -  the people who stay in my place as "renters" {for me, a renter is a tenant = longer lease}.  I consider everyone my "guests" {guests visit...and go away}.  And, I treat everyone, regardless, equally.  I think there is a difference in demeanor...some people seem to consider themselves as "renters"...and their demeanor seems different, to me, than those who consider themselves as "the guests" in my home.   The "renter" pays me money for something and the "renter" demeanor translates into "it's mine and I'll use it as I will"...because I paid for it.  The "guest attitude" is more gracious...the guest seems open to being "guided"...and they ease into conversation more easily....they want to "connect". The "guest" is  interested....the "renter" just wants to get inside...make the obligatory chit chat - keep it short -...stay and leave. During the stay, the "renter" is more aloof...they are not rude...they just don't feel the need to connect, again, after they paid...the deal is done.   My "screening" formula, which is not fool proof is this:  I think I have met more of the "renter attitude" when someone tells me, in the inquiry process, that they have rented "many" homes:....and....they know what  "you Owners" want, etc. {I have been told this}....and for them  I do not need to "explain much" because they  have experience...they know. When I get that kind  of response, I feel  I'm dealing with a "renter attitude"...someone who lived in a lot of other people's homes....they take more liberty using the home...because it's "theirs...they paid".   They are not necessarily disrespectful to my place...often they are good house guests...they just did the minimim obligation on their part -- pay & stay.  The "guest attitude" just seems more gracious...interested in a "walk through" orientation on arrival, they like a chat ....and willing to take a minute to either write in my guestbook...or do an online review.  I always enjoy more dealing with "the guest demeanour"...but I do not "screen out" the "renter attitude" from staying at my place......unless I sense they are not well mannered ..in the inquiry.  My benchmark is: etiquette.  Basic manners, just being polite is a gateway to my place.

        • anja Senior Contributor 1,556 posts since
          Aug 9, 2011
          Currently Being Moderated
          Feb 18, 2012 6:02 PM (in response to gmajay)
          Re: When NOT to rent?

          Oh yes, gmajay...that was my defination, as well..."I pay...I stay...the place is mine to use as I want".  I don't blame you for feeling as you do. Not paying on time is definitely  a red flag for me, as well....because not  paying  on time weakens  my "trust" in them from the get-go to be the good "guest" -vs-  just the "renter" who thinks it's okay to keep me  waiting --- because they've done it before, elsewhere.  I've had similar experiences with a few people lagging behind on returning a contract and they turned out to also be very late with the deposit when they'd ask for a week or two more extension. The extension passes...and no money...and they still think the place is "theirs"...just because they told us they wanted it....even if they hadn't paid for it, yet.  I'm more sensitive to those situations now ...I'll only send one reminder...that the place is not secured and we have it still open "on the market".  During the stay, they get what we agreed...and I step back from those types....I keep out of sight.  But, the "renter attitude" expresses itself in other ways....and it can sometimes influence me to "be quite attentive" that I have a "renter", on  board.  Last month, I had someone tell me, quite bluntly, that I did not give them directions from the airport. He called me from the airport, on arrival here, and told me that I never sent them driving directions and they didn't know how to find us or even where we are!  His tone was curt...no aloha!  I knew that I sent them everything ....I'm very careful with tracking....I sent our address, driving directions, including maps, Google Earth image....even how to reach Costco from the airport in case they wanted to shop before checking in...because he asked about that...and then the directions to us from Costco, too.  He insisted that he never got it  {he got all my other mails...so guess what I was thinking - he didn't want to admit he left it home - it's easier to blame the Owner}. That guy was always very "short" in all his communications...as if he didn't have the time to give me - while I was helping him with all his questions.  They reached my place much later than I expected...so I presumed they went to Costco first.  When I asked, they told me they decided, instead,  to stop for dinner  ...and they knew I was waiting for them...but they didn't bother to tell me they'd be much later...it was almost 3 hours later {and I rushed through my own quick dinner so I'd be at the cottage to greet them}.  Our meeting was brief because they said they too were tired to "meet".  I let them in and we agreed that I should come in the morning so we could "orient" together.  I arrive and what do I see on the dining table....the driving directions!   I said something like:  "Oh I'm so glad you found them."  And, they said - absolutely nothing. ...and they had charged me of not giving it to them - causing them "anxiety" in the airport looking for my telephone number {that was the underlying message because my tel # was on the drive directions}.  Good thing they had  my business card...so they said. These  people traveled with their gadgets - iphone, ipad...they could have emailed or called from California where they had 4 hour lay over, or from Honolulu where they stayed 2 days prior to my island  ....but no...they were too self absorbed...they waited to land here...get all "nervous"...and then attempt to make me feel as if I neglected them.  No apology. Their stay was punctuated with a couple of "requests", a.k.a the "renter attitude"...not the gracious "guests". There was never a shred of grace projected....no thank you for any of our time we jumped in to help when they "snapped" their fingers  twice...never  excusing themselves for the time of day they came over to our door...usually dinner time...step away from our table to help them.....{we were annoyed at that point}. Except....they did leave me {whew}  with a very nice guestbook entry about their stay.  Now, admittedly, I was nervous during the entire week they were here..{Was it good enough for them? Would they nit pick? Would they do a negative"review" ?}. So, it came as a great {sigh} of relief when I read their very nice remarks - completely out of character for them - in our guestbook that they left "opened" on the coffee table so I'd find it.  At least, that one ended well for me...the "renter" arrived - stayed-  and checked out "like a gracious guest".

    • lrbaldwin Active Contributor 755 posts since
      Feb 16, 2011
      Currently Being Moderated
      Feb 29, 2012 7:16 AM (in response to gmajay)
      Re: When NOT to rent?

      gmajay,

       

      I'm with you on entitlement.  Here's one that just started last week.  I emailed our 2012 guests with a little survey asking what 1 or 2 things made you choose our cottage, how did you find VRBO (somebody suggested it, you always "shop" there, etc).  I told them to answer all, some, or ignore the email altogether.  I got some helpful information, expecially from a woman from Long Island who was coming just with her doctor husband, both around 60 yrs old.  Perfect guests, right?  Daisy, who had already paid for half the rent for her June 24 week that she reserved back in October of 2011, answered that the two reasons she chose us were 1. price (ugh, I want them to want the cottage for the cottage.  Oh well, whatever) and, get this...2. the pool.  Yep, she was absolutely right that there is no better price in the entire Outer Banks for a 4 BR house with a pool. OK, that's fine, but WE DON'T HAVE A POOL, never have had one, never will.  So I immediately called her cell phone number...no answer.  Then I called her home phone.  Husband answers, I ask if I may speak to Daisy, he says very gruffly, "I beg your pardon."  I gave him the number I thought I had dialed and he, again very gruffly, said "Yes that is correct.  What is this in reference to?"  I told him I was the owner of the cottage they were renting and he finally settled down, got downright friendly, and called Daisy to the phone.  She informed me that she doesn't answer her cell phone if she doesn't recognize the number.  So I informed her that we do not have a pool.  At first she didn't believe me, said she was sure there was a pool, and asked for the listing number so she could look at it.  Red flags are flying all over the place at this point.  She finally admitted that she had made a mistake and that not having a pool was a deal breaker.  According to our lease, she can cancel and get her money back if and when we re-rent the cottage.  There's no way I was going to rent to her or have anything to do with her entitled self from that moment on, so I told her right away that we would send her money back immediately, no strings attached.

       

      What if I hadn't sent out that survey?  She would have arrived in June and been livid that there was no pool.  At that point there'd be nothing we could do.  She'd probably be pi**ed off for the whole week and all I could do was hope she didn't submit a review......and also hope that she didn't abuse the house.  Occasionally something happens to me that comes close to getting me some religion.  This was one of them.

       

      Linda

      Let me know if you can find any evidence of a pool at http://vrbo.com/315522

  • sandybeach Contributor 56 posts since
    Jan 2, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 29, 2012 9:47 AM (in response to gmajay)
    Re: When NOT to rent?

    As a former guest (or renter?) and now owner, I can understand how people can be perceived. 

     

    However, as most of us who get into this sort of work are extraverts, I'll note that there are intraverts who won't enjoy making small talk and who are respectful but very uncomfortable being on the phone and looking to minimize their interactions with the owner.  I am close to several people who would fall into this category and they might get (unfairly, IMO) filtered out.

      • New Member 6 posts since
        Dec 9, 2011
        Currently Being Moderated
        Mar 1, 2012 9:39 AM (in response to gmajay)
        Re: When NOT to rent?

        Wow....it is nice to hear that I have not been alone dealing with rude people. I'm only a year into renting and our first rental was via referral from a friend. Innocent I was. It has been the worse guests we have had. Since then we have learned: prefer not to rent than to rent to the wrong person; not to exceed the maximum occupancy; speak directly with them (you get lots of feedback of who you are talking to), purpose of the trip. We usually don't want children given that our condo is high end with some nice pieces but by speaking with the parents we get a fairly good idea if the kids are brats; we stay away from toddlers to 10-13 y/o thereafter is touch and good depending on the parent actitud while on the phone. We have strict rules about parties and penalties along with it. Last year received a request for rental for 6 adults (max occupancy). Got them on the phone and starting chating about their reason going down there and out of the blue it came out that other friends have rented two other unit in the complex for the same time period.....RED FLAG. Party time. Refused rental.

        Any guest changing my contract before we agreed upon it is not welcome. When the contract goes out we already have address all the issues. Oh, I have a clause in my contract that any default on the contract they will be evicted by my property manager.

        I decided to have an electronic lock which I can blocked their entrance to the unit. Best thing I get thus I have control in those kind of situations.

  • marilyn Active Contributor 459 posts since
    Nov 9, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 29, 2012 12:53 PM (in response to gmajay)
    Re: When NOT to rent?

    under 21 (legal drinking age in New York), spring break, parties, wedding or any events on my property. No fund raising, no birthday parties. We offer only sleeping accommodations with bbq, pool and a nice relaxing vacation.

  • sliver2907 Contributor 69 posts since
    Sep 2, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 30, 2012 1:14 PM (in response to gmajay)
    Re: When NOT to rent?

    Had a potential renter email that he was interested in a week in Spring.  After a couple emails "full confession".  The rental was for his "angel" spring break daughter and her 4 friends.  I said no problem.  They would each need to put down 1 week as a deposit and then pay the one week rental fee.  The $7000 deposit would be fully refunded as long as 1)the police were not called 2) the neighbors did not report any parites.  3)  the house was returned in the condition that it was given to them in.  "Dad" said that the deposit was a deal breaker for him.  I wrote back and said that the deposit would be refunded as long as the provisions of the contract were met.  Souldn't be a problem for the "angels" that were coming to stay.  After all, it was each girls responsiblity to put down a depsoit share, not dad.  "I have decided we will try a different route" said "dad".  Don't be afraid of deposits or discussing them.  Anyone who is going to treat your place right will not have a problem with the deposit amount because they are going to be responsible.

    • jan.stevens Community All-Star 251 posts since
      Aug 30, 2011
      Currently Being Moderated
      Mar 30, 2012 1:33 PM (in response to sliver2907)
      Re: When NOT to rent?

      Silver, I agree with the high security deposit. It really does stop the possible offenders from booking. 

       

      Last summer I had a group of 9 rent my property and unbeknown to me

       

      they invited 6 friends for the day that arrived via sailboat. They broke all kinds of rules. They overwhelmed the community dock so my neighbors couldn't use the dock. My property turned into their party house for the day. Needless to say I heard many complaints from the neighbors.

       

      This experience taught me a big lesson about who to rent to.

       

      This was a great opportunity for me to revise my rental agreement:

      •    I added a LARGE security deposit to groups. and make it clear that if any part of the rental agreement is violated I will keep the security deposit INCLUDING but not limited to "unnapproved guests."
      • I pay close attention to groups of people where none of the last names match.........in most cases it is a group of friends having a FUN weekend. 
      •      I added a clause about "only approved guests are allowed to use our community dock."

       

       

      Sure enough this group had such a great party weekend they asked if they could book again this summer.  I said, "sure" and then hit them with the new and improved rental agreement. I haven't heard back from them. 

       

      Jan  

    • marilyn Active Contributor 459 posts since
      Nov 9, 2011
      Currently Being Moderated
      Mar 30, 2012 5:16 PM (in response to sliver2907)
      Re: When NOT to rent?

      Although we market our homes as pet friendly, I really mean dog friend. Sorry cat lovers out there, I am very allergic.

       

      When checking out a tenant last summer, boy was I surprised to meet Frank the dragon (not sure type) reptile three feet long. Our guests had not finished packing and he was the last to go into the car, SO, to my surprise I saw him. They never asked if it was o.k. to bring. Not sure I would have found out about him (assume male, but not sure) if I had not arrived early.

       

      Goes to show you guests will sneak in all sorts of animals.

       

      Marilyn

      www.hamptonhouseproperties.info

    • marilyn Active Contributor 459 posts since
      Nov 9, 2011
      Currently Being Moderated
      Mar 30, 2012 5:21 PM (in response to sliver2907)
      Re: When NOT to rent?

      I love your idea!

       

      Because my homes are rather large, 7 bedrooms or more, I get approximately 125 -150 prom requests per prom season. The daughter or son is always a straight "A" student, as if that would make them more respectful of your home. When asking the parents if they will be there the answer is almost always "oh no, we wouldn't want to cramp their style or impose of them". Tempted to say why don't you rent them your home.

       

      Marilyn

      www.hamptonhouseproperties.com

  • New Member 8 posts since
    Mar 27, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 30, 2012 8:17 PM (in response to gmajay)
    Re: When NOT to rent?

    Great stories! So does anyone tell them why you're not renting to them, or do you make up an excuse about being booked during that time?

     

    Matt

  • Contributor 233 posts since
    Dec 26, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 31, 2012 8:13 PM (in response to gmajay)
    Re: When NOT to rent?

    Great question.  I currently have an inquiry for several weeks that I would love to book.  However, after a quick google search, I see that he is an attorney that has a reputation for seeking out companies to sue for a reason I won't disclose in case he's reading this!  I had a previous issue with an attorney when I failed to return the security deposit due to evidence of them having a dog in our no-pet property.  After many of his threats, I finally just returned the deposit to avoid the stress involved.  Do you think I am justified in my concerns of potential security deposit and/or issues that might arise should I rent to him and his 5 children?  They are also over the maximum occupancy by 1 (could be an infant which wouldn't be an issue in an of itself).

    • marilyn Active Contributor 459 posts since
      Nov 9, 2011
      Currently Being Moderated
      Apr 1, 2012 1:08 PM (in response to dbmeyer)
      Re: When NOT to rent?

      I am thinking about setting up a form questionaire with regards to pets, breed, how many, with # of guests, adults age range, children ages, etc. etc. etc. AND, on the questionaire note that security deposit is withheld in the event guest has lied about any of the questions. Have them sign it. Then, should they do something which is not agreed upon, you will have their signature on a document which shows they have lied. This might be a better solution than worrying if the tenant will sue you or not. Besides attorneys, guests can sue as well.

       

      Marilyn

      www.hamptonhouseproperties.info

      • msdebj Senior Contributor 1,358 posts since
        May 25, 2011
        Currently Being Moderated
        Apr 1, 2012 1:25 PM (in response to marilyn)
        Re: When NOT to rent?

        Marilyn,  all of my ads say under Pets "Ask". I have a seperate Pet Policy that asks the questions you're referring to (size, breed, etc.). Our Rental agreement asks for full discloser re: ages, etc. AND about pets..

         

        Damage deposit agreement also states they can be immediately evicted and lose all moneis ( including the DD) if they bring unauthorized, or unapproved pets AND guests.

         

        Many insurance polices do not cover (and even become null and void) if you allow certain breeds on site.

         

        So you're on to something.. DOCUMENT, document & document!!

        • marilyn Active Contributor 459 posts since
          Nov 9, 2011
          Currently Being Moderated
          Apr 1, 2012 1:54 PM (in response to msdebj)
          Re: When NOT to rent?

          To dbmeyer:  Did the first attorney fill out your questionaire and did he lie about the dog? What evidence did you provide regarding the pet?

           

          Ms debj: How many people ask with regards to how many bring a pet without telling? Have you ever had to keep the DD because a renter brought a pet?

           

          Marilyn

          www.hamptonhouseproperties.info

          • msdebj Senior Contributor 1,358 posts since
            May 25, 2011
            Currently Being Moderated
            Apr 1, 2012 2:08 PM (in response to marilyn)
            Re: When NOT to rent?

            Marilyn,

            I've actually had no problems with unapproved pets, since I spell things out in plain lanuage in my responses and agreements.

             

            I HAVE declined some rentals with dogs over 40 pounds , but have also made a few exceptions ( after talking with the renter,regarding the breed, etc).  The beauty of managing my own rentals!!

             

            Many people with certain breeds are VERY aware of insurnce policies.

             

            I've had 3 rentals in the past 3 years contact me a month before ( final payment is due)  asking to bring a small dog ( under 25 lbs),  and they have all been fine. BUT, they had to sign our Pet Policy-- and all was well. They may have been some of my best renters, to date.

            debj

          • Contributor 233 posts since
            Dec 26, 2011
            Currently Being Moderated
            Apr 1, 2012 3:05 PM (in response to marilyn)
            Re: When NOT to rent?

            We have a NO pet policy, which the attorney/renter agreed to in writing.  When I presented evidence of dog food, hair everywhere, paw prints on sliders, and dog poo outside, they denied that was theirs, and went so far as to leave me screaming, cursing voice messages, and in his emails threatened to sue me and to turn me in for building code violations, etc.  I couldn't deal with the stress of all of this over $500, and just returned the $500 letting him know how I felt about him and his family and their lack of integrity, etc.  I thought about contacting his employer (he's also a law professor) to let them know what type of person was teaching at their well-known school, but just had to let it go.  This is why I am reluctant to rent to certain people who give me reason for concern.

            • momskico Contributor 31 posts since
              Jul 24, 2012
              Currently Being Moderated
              May 16, 2013 11:24 AM (in response to dbmeyer)
              Re: When NOT to rent?

              Have one right now that I won't rent to.

               

              Sent an email requesting 3 nights over the 4th of July.  I responded politely thanking him for his interest, stating we only accept week long rentals over the holiday week and wishing him well on his vacation.  I received an email back from him stating that our rate chart states there is a 4 night minimum or a cleaning fee and that he is excepting said offer for 3 nights plus the cleaning fee and that I need to honor our advertized rate or explain to him why he is not eligible to rent our home for those dates. 

               

              Our property is located in an area where prices vary dramaticly throughout the year and given the limitations in space for posting the rates, it is listed like this:

               

              May 21- Sept 30 225/265 per night (4 night minimum or $150 clean) 7th night free except July 4th. 

               

              There isn't room to list:

              May 21-Sept 30 225/265 per night 4 night minimum or $150 clean except July 4th week, 7th night free except July 4th week.

               

              It also says:  Until confirmed, rates are subject to change without notice.

               

              Red flags - I smell a rat.  I don't like the tone this gentleman took with me and wouldn't rent to him if he were the last guest on earth. 

               

              I showed the email to my husband who looked the gentleman up and turns out he is an attorney.  This made me remember a horror story in the forums I saw a year or two ago where someone had no agreement and was an attorney, yet sued the homeowner for not allowing him to stay in the property (said property was somewhere in CA).  I cannot remember the exact details, but I seem to recall he had no agreement, no deposit and showed up in California then sued the homeowner for the cost of his families trip as he was unable to stay in the home when he got there.  Sounds nuts, but there was some goofy law that he was going after them under. Plus, it was costing the home owner a bunch of money to defend themselves against this gentleman.   I don't want to be his next victim if he or another attorney is running the same scam. 

               

              This is our vacation home. If we don't get a rental the length of our choosing we would elect to go with our friends and children rather than do a super short holiday booking.   My husband said I should just tell the gentleman that this is the case.  It doesn't matter because I have another group in place taking the week.

               

              Here's the question.  Do I respond and let him know someone else is taking the home for the week thereby engaging in dialogue with an attorney that might be trying to come up with ammunition to use against me?  Do I ignore him  and run the risk of him showing up at the booked rental and claim I have caused him damages to fly his family to vacation here as he told me he was "accepting my offer"  as happened to the CA  couple I mentioned earlier?  I think that guy even filed in the state of TX so the owners had to go there to defend themselves.  If it weren't already spoken for is there some odd law that would require me to rent to this **** merely because I have a listing on vrbo/homeaway?  I recall someone else on the east coast also having someone threatening to sue them and report them to the BBB because she wasn't renting to them also here on this forum. Seems like that would be utter BS but I know I have seen crazy stories like this.  Sheesh.

              • lazym Active Contributor 394 posts since
                Sep 5, 2012
                Currently Being Moderated
                May 16, 2013 11:40 AM (in response to momskico)
                Re: When NOT to rent?

                I just read your requirements and to me it seems like, because of the way it is written (and I know this isn’t your fault but a fault of the website set-up), that you can do a 3 or 4 night rental over the 4th of July week you just would not get a free 7th night.  And after reading a 2nd, 3rd and 4th time I still feel it says that and not that you have to do a 7 night rental over the 4th of July. If you already have someone set up to rent it for a week I would tell him that.  If not I would honor his request, unless you truly think you will not be able to rent the other 4 nights, I mean he is willing to pay the extra cleaning fee for 3 nights. It is very possible that someone might want the other 4 days (or 3) because the 4th is in the middle of the week and some people can’t take a whole week off. 

                 

                One thing I have learned both from this business and my other one is that tone over email can be taken very differently than the person meant to sound (and with lawyers this is even more likely to happen because they normally have to be so “strict” in the way the communicate). 

                 

                If he is willing to pay the whole rate and sign your Rental Agreement according to your regular terms I would not think it is a scam. 

              • marilyn Active Contributor 459 posts since
                Nov 9, 2011
                Currently Being Moderated
                May 16, 2013 11:41 AM (in response to momskico)
                Re: When NOT to rent?

                Sometimes less is more.

                A simple statement, "we are sorry to inform you that the home has been rented".

                If you don't answer, not good business practice. Who knows how many people this person knows and can send lots of bad press out to others.  If push comes to shove, point out that  "rates are subject to change"
                . Keep it simple. Don't get caught up in a debate that may cause you to say something that can be used against you. Good luck.

              • larkobx Contributor 134 posts since
                Feb 16, 2013
                Currently Being Moderated
                May 16, 2013 2:20 PM (in response to momskico)
                Re: When NOT to rent?

                You never offered to rent to this particular person, so there's nothing for him to "accept." I agree with marilyn to keep your reply simple and tell him it's no longer available.

                 

                Moving forward you might consider changing your ad copy. Maybe something like, "May 21- Sept 30 225/265 per night (4 night minimum or $150 clean) 7th night free. July 4th requires 7 night min."

                 

                We went through this recently with Memorial Day and this was part of my standard reply, "Thank you for your interest in our vacation loft. We are currently holding Memorial Day as a potential week-long rental, but are happy to keep you on the list and can contact you closer to the date if you're still interested in a weekend stay."

              • sage Community All-Star 966 posts since
                Jul 4, 2012
                Currently Being Moderated
                May 16, 2013 2:55 PM (in response to momskico)
                Re: When NOT to rent?

                You have already told the man no, and gave him a reason.  There is absolutely no need to respond to any more of his communications.  His demand that you honor your advertised rate or "explain why he is not eligible" to rent demonstrate a bad attitude that, for me, would be disqualifying.

                 

                While you may not illegally discriminate in your rentals, you may legally discriminate against people on bases that are not protected.  You may discriminate on the basis that the person is a ****.  Attorneys are not a protected class of individuals, and you may discriminate against attorneys (even though not all are jerks).

                 

                To give a response that is a lie could be a mistake because it tends to suggest that you do not have a legitimate basis for rejecting his request.

                 

                You probably know the Miranda warning from watching police shows -- "You have the right to remain silent.  Anything you say can and will be used against you . . . ."  The essence of this holds true in civil cases as well as in criminal prosecutions.  If you respond to this man, and if he is as litigious as your description suggests, he may sue you and whatever you say to him may be used against you.  Words may be twisted to trick and confuse (any good trial attorney or detective can tell you about that).  The less said, the better in situations such as this.

                 

                I recently declined an inquiry and explained to the man that there was not enough time to complete the paperwork and get keys to him in the 2 days before he wanted to check in.  He responded to demand that I rent to him because my calendar showed the dates as available.  Having responded once with my explanation, I felt no need to respond further.  He sent me emails daily for several days that grew increasingly confrontational and erratic.  In situations like this, unless one wants to participate in an email argument no good can come from further communication.  To be polite and professional does not require a response to every communication.

  • victorianluxuries New Member 1 posts since
    Mar 13, 2013
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 16, 2013 5:31 PM (in response to gmajay)
    Re: When NOT to rent?

    In my 9 plus years privately renting a condo on the beach, I have learned some hard fast rules.

     

    1.If they happen call and sound shadey or by email go with your gut!

     

    2.Never rent/book without a Credit Card, always take a deposit.

     

    3.If they immediately ask about your cancellation policy that is probably a red flag proceed with caution and stick to your policy especially if they try to use a "death in the family" excuse...sound cruel but there are some people who are professionals at  getting "free rooms".

     

    4.Dont let them scare you with a Bad review on your website, I recently encountered a threat of a bad review but stuck to the facts of the Rental Agreement and informed the person I didn't care, the so called bad review was never written.

     

    5. Have your cleaning team or yourself enter the premisses the day of departure to check for damages and take good pictures.

     

    6. We all like to be 100% booked and sometime I have 2 or 3 people for the similar time frame naturally chosing the logest rental time which =more income. I have a friend who i give my overflow rentals to and she is even cheaper so the people are happy I provided them with an alternative.

  • bobbie32 Senior Contributor 1,084 posts since
    May 21, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 20, 2013 12:42 PM (in response to gmajay)
    Re: When NOT to rent?

    I simply tell them that we cannot meet their expectations and suggest other places that might be more appropriate. 

Not a member?

JOIN THE COMMUNITY

Register Now

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Legend

  • Best Answers - 4 points
  • Helpful Answers - 2 points