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As a follow up to my previous post, International Family Travel (Part 1): Passports, Jetlag and New Food, Oh My!, I’ve included a few more tips here to help make your family vacation more like something you want to make a photo book out of and less like something out of a horror story.

 

What to Pack:

Make a list and check it twice. I like to make a checklist as I go through a normal day with my kids - this way I don't forget anything when I’m preparing to globetrot with them. While this tactic is useful for any type of family vacation, it’s particularly helpful when traveling abroad because there is more to keep track of. 

 

> Baby items. It can be stressful to travel with tons of baby gear (see Tips for Flying with a Newborn or Infant), so it’s always a good idea to keep your child’s gear needs in mind when deciding on a place to stay. Your choice can cut down on how much you end up bringing from home. Many hotels will offer a crib and maybe even a highchair, but if you need more than that, it’s often easy to find vacation rental homes pre-stocked with additional baby-friendly extras like bouncy chairs, swings, toys and more. You can also consider a baby gear rental company for bigger items; however, you’ll have to search locally at your destination for these services.

 

For every-day items, sites like JetSetBabies.com can ship baby supplies like diapers, wipes, formula and more to your destination ahead of time. They have great packages that can jump-start your own packing list and have an experience-driven international shipping policy. When traveling to Mexico, Mexico Lots for Tots provides both daily-use items and rental gear. As they say on their website, “Enfamil, Enfapro and Similac infant formulas are readily available in Mexico, so why not order before you go?” 

 

If you're traveling with infants, in my experience, it’s easiest to pack powdered formula because it’s lighter than liquid and won’t spoil. Also, when I have access to a microwave, Medela Quick Clean Micro-Steam bags are my secret weapon for sterilization on the go. (Hello clean bottles, teething rings and pacifiers!)

 

> Medication. I recommend bringing a few basic over-the-counter (OTC) medicines in addition to any prescription meds your family takes regularly. Especially for your kids, pack at least one medication for common ailments such as pain, cold/cough and stomachaches. I travel with basics like children's ibuprofen, allergy medicine and homeopathic teething drops. 

 

Also, make sure to pack a travel-sized first aid kit, or at least the basic items from one. You never know when you might need something simple like a Band-Aid or antibiotic ointment – or as my kids call it "hurt cream." Find out how to put a great travel first aid kit together at KidsTravelDoc.com

 

If you purchase OTC meds at your destination, remember that the dosage can be different there and it may not measure the way you're used to (metric system, for instance). Another thing to remember in this regard: know the current weight of your kids for before you travel (you may also need to know how to make weight conversions for proper dosage).

 

Medical Needs:

> Getting your shots. There are all sorts of things you and your kids can be exposed to when traveling to a foreign country. Let your doctor and your kids' doctor know where you’re headed as soon as you book your trip so you can plan any  shots needed ahead of time. Some shots require an incubation period before they become effective making it necessary to get them weeks before you leave.  

 

It’s a good idea to make a copy of your family’s vaccination records and keep them with you while traveling. Also, scan them and email them to yourself so you have duplicate access on the road in addition to hard copies. My favorite new app is called Genius Scan, which makes a scanner out of your iPhone. It doesn’t get any easier than that.

 

> Medical treatment abroad. Each country is different in the way they handle patients and if you do end up needing a doctor you'll want to know ahead of time exactly what to do and what you’ll need. It’s always a good idea to call your health insurance company before you leave to find out if you have coverage abroad. Ask questions like: Does your health insurance work at your destination? Do you need your medical records with you if someone in your family suffers a chronic illness? And, make sure to carry your medical insurance card with you, regardless.

 

I hope you enjoy globetrotting with your kids as much as I have.

 

Diana Heather writes at ParentingsATrip.com. She is also the Chief Mom, both at home to her two girls and at Totsy.com. You can follow Diana on Twitter @ParentingsATrip

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